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Jörg Rhiemeier, On 24/09/2010 17:55:
> On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 08:56:03 +0100, R A Brown wrote:
>>  On 23/09/2010 23:34, Jörg Rhiemeier wrote:
>>  >  Indeed, indeed! There is not a shred of evidence for the
>>  >  existence of any of the Insular Celtic peculiarities
>>  >  (VSO word order, initial mutations, profusion of spirants
>>  >  from the lenition of stops, etc.) in Gaulish, Lepontic
>>  >  or Celtiberian! These languages are much more similar to
>>  >  Latin in their structure than they are to Insular
>>  >  Celtic.
>>
>>  Absolutely - yet if a conlang occurs that purports to be a
>>  survival of a Continental Celtic language, what's the
>>  betting it will have most, if not all, of these features!
> 
> The only Continental Celtic conlang I am aware of is Dan Jones's
> Arvorec, and it *does* have all those features.  Sigh.
> 
>>  >  The Continental Celtic language I have under work for
>>  >  the League of Lost Language shows *nothing* of the
>>  >  typical traits of an Insular Celtic language.
>>
>>  Good for you.
> 
> The avoidance of all Insular Celtic features is the main point
> in that project.  Camonic (as I name it) is pretty much a reply
> on Arvorec.

I can understand why one might desire to make a conlang that derives, like Arvorec, from continental Celtic but, unlike Arvorec, via a trajectory more like, say, French or Spanish, and less like Welsh and Irish. 

But I don't see what is wrong with Arvorec's development either. By the time the familiar distinctive phonological characteristics of Welsh were developing, the contintental Celtic lgs were dead, but if in an alternate history, Gaulish had remained in Armorica, why should those changes that spread within Insular Celtic by areal diffusion not also have spread to Armorica? 

--And.