Print

Print


Um... sorry, Gary, but according to Bruce Mitchell (1998), it isn't  
true. The Old English case system has "es" as the genitive suffix. The  
genitive form of "he" is "his", whereas the genitive of "mann" is  
"mannes" ("s mannes dohtor")

On 17 Oct 2010, at 17:42, Gary Shannon wrote:

> Disclaimer: I know absolutely nothing academic about the subject and
> can only contribute wild guesses.
>
> That said, I've always felt that the English genitive marker ('s) is a
> contraction of "his" as in "John his dog..." => "John's dog...". I
> like this theory even it it's not true. :) (Just like I like my theory
> about verb past tense endings being derived from "did", as in "John
> turn did" => "John turned.")
>
> --gary
>
> On Sun, Oct 17, 2010 at 4:14 AM, Daniel Prohaska
> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> Other parts of speech may be involved, too, such as verb in an SOV  
>> or OSV language. Consider a sentence such as:
>>
>> Man tree see. Man tree climb.
>>
>> This can be contracted to:
>>
>> Man tree-see climb.
>>
>> see eventually becomes a marker for the object, and the meaning  
>> shifts from a man sees a tree and climbs it to a man climbs a  
>> tree.
>>
>> Dan