Print

Print


staving Matthew Boutilier:
>> "Jan z'n hond" is a perfectly correct
>> way to translate "John's dog" and literally does mean "John his dog".
>>
>>      
> interestingly, an analog construction has developed in the egyptian dialect
> of arabic.
> whereas in classical arabic one would say
> ίαΘ ΓΝγΟ kalbu ahmadi (the.dog-NOM Ahmed-GEN)
> in the modern colloquial it becomes
> ΓΝγΟ ίαΘε ahmad kalbuh (Ahmed the.dog-his)
> for "Ahmed's dog."
> similarly, of course, for feminine:
> Σαγμ ίαΘεΗ salma kalbiha (Selma the.dog-her)
>
>
>    
In Shakespeare, we do get examples like

"Once in a sea-fight against the Count his galleys" (Twelfth Night)

Does anyone know when and how the form arose in English? And are there 
examples with "her" and "its", or is "his" acting as an invariable 
particle in this construction?

Pete