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2010/10/19 René Uittenbogaard <[log in to unmask]>

> About "den man z'n": there is a very interesting document
> about this construction online:
>
> http://www.als.asn.au/proceedings/als2002/Hendriks.pdf
>
> indicating that the construction in Dutch dates back as far as 1268,
> with feminine singular agreement. His interlinear reads:
>
> Ende al hebbe ic hem ghegeven die oude Dilf hare port met the merne...
> And already have I him given that old Dilf her-APP city with the wall...
> "And I have already given him that city of Old Delft with the wall..."
>
> René
>

Extremely interesting! Apparently, I was wrong to think the APP construction
("Auxiliary Pronoun Possessive", nice name!) in Dutch was a modern
development, However, this paper hints indeed that even though it evolved in
various different Germanic languages, those developments needn't be related.
For instance, the German APP mandates the dative on the possessor. The paper
above shows examples in Dutch where the possessor is in the nominative,
accusative or genitive.

The issue of gender agreement between the possessive pronoun and the
possessor is an interesting one, because I actually know of one dialect of
Dutch (one of the dialects spoken in Brabant) that has the interesting
feature of having inverse gender agreement in its APP constructions, i.e. a
masculine possessor takes a feminine possessive pronoun and vice versa! I've
heard people talk that way, and it's very weird. I can't imagine how it came
to be that way...
-- 
Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.

http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com/
http://www.christophoronomicon.nl/