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In Nauspayr <x> = IPA's /x/ or /ɣ/
In New-Mancunian <x> = IPA's /ʃ/

Are we culturally preconditioned to think of <x> as representing the / 
ks/ sound in English / Latin? That is, either as a velar plosive or a  
fricative or a combination of both?

On 24 Oct 2010, at 11:10, Charlie wrote:

> --- In [log in to unmask], David Peterson <dedalvs@...> wrote:
>>
>> The shape "X" seems common enough that it should show up in a
>> variety of conscripts. I say we start a thread tracking it! So so  
>> far we
>> have:
>>
>> Zhyler (David Peterson): /l/
>> ? (Matt Turnbull): /k/
>> Teonaht (Sally Caves): /k/
>> Géarthnuns (Kou): /tÊf/
>>
>> And then I can add the following:
>>
>> Kamakawi (David Peterson): /a/
>> Sathir (David Peterson): /o/
>> Njaama (David Peterson): low tone marker
>> Gweydr (David Peterson): /f/
>> Sheli (David Peterson): null (vowel carrier)
>> Tan Tyls (David Peterson): number 7
>> Sidaan (David Peterson): /o/
>>
>
> In Senjecas, <x> = IPA's /ç/; X-Sampa's /C/.
> Charlie