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Right-to-left text is possible, but only with the areas of Unicode
that Unicode has designated as right-to-left. That would mean abusing
the code points used for things like Hebrew -- there aren't enough of
them for what you want to do, and you're just leaving the door open
for all kinds of problems. You can't do right-to-left with the Private
Use Area, AFAIK. And I don't think you could do bottom-to-top at all.

Composing the characters is possible, though, just a lot of work.


On Tue, Nov 23, 2010 at 2:53 PM, Patrick Michael Niedzielski
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> On mar, 2010-11-23 at 17:02 -0500, Calculator Ftvb wrote:
>> Hello ! I've created a conlang that is read right-to-left, bottom-to-top,
>> composed of glyphs that consist of two characters, joined vertically, both
>> of which can take one of several forms based on the context (but the forms
>> are based on a consistent set of rules, so would be able to be automatically
>> implemented by a computer). How would I go about creating a font for that
>> and getting it to work in a word-processing program? (I'm pretty new to font
>> creation.) Thanks!
>>
>> óCalculator Ftvb
>
> Seems really complicated...not something that many word processors can
> handle. †I can tell you that OpenOffice.org/LibreOffice would not even
> support the direction of your text! †(I tried once to type Vulcan, and
> that didn't go over well.) †I'm not sure about Word, but I also think it
> won't like bottom to top, right to left.
>
> I don't know how much help that will be to you.
>
> Cheers,
> Patrick
>
> --
> Humm and Strumm <http://hummstrumm.blogspot.com/>, a Free Software 3D
> adventure game for both Windows and *NIX.
>
> freeSoftwareHacker(); <http://freesoftwarehacker.blogspot.com/>, a blog
> about Free Software, music, and law.
>