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I know this is a bit QI, but Stephen Fry (so it must be true) says the whole 5 senses thing was invented by Aristotle. Might a more exotic (non-western) language consider senses differently? "I have proprioception" anyone? Some languages might not differentiate taste and smell, as with basic colour terms. And this is just for humans - "I take the magnetoception".
And, by the way, if memory serves "takes the ear" is/was fine in English, "The Tempest" - "the tale takes the ear strangely" (not an exact quote)



On 14 Jan 2011, at 20:52, Gary Shannon <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Here's an idea for a systematic set of sensory verbs based on the
> concepts of "take", "have", "give".
> 
> First, consider there to be SIX senses, sight, hearing, smell, taste,
> touch, and awareness of mental states.
> Next, let there be three verbs representing receipt, possession, and
> loss of possession. For each of the three verbs let there be three
> modifiers representing voluntary/active, neutral/passive/indifferent,
> and involuntary.
> 
> For each verb as modified we have:
> 
> take (receive actively); get (as a passive recipient); get (as an
> involuntary recipient)
> hold (actively have); have (passively or indifferently); have (as an
> involuntary possessor: I have the flu.)
> give (to actively choose to give); ??? (as a passive or indifferent
> donor); lose (as an involuntary donor)
> 
> Additional nuances such "to steal", to be the victim of theft, or "to
> discard" are also possible.
> 
> Using each of these verbs with the sensory channel as the agent of the
> verb we can do without specific verbs for "see", "hear", "look at",
> "taste", "smell", "remember", and so on.
> 
> My eye takes the balloon = I look at the balloon. (or with an
> intensity modifier: I examine the balloon.)
> My eye gets the clouds = I see the clouds (but not as the result of
> active pursuit of the vision.)
> My eye gets-involuntarily the accident = I see (against my desire to
> do so) the accident.
> My eye discards his face = I look way from, or refuse to look at his face.
> 
> My ear takes the music = I listen to the music.
> My ear gets the children playing = I hear the children playing.
> My ear gets-involuntarily the noise = I hear (against my desire to do
> so) the noise.
> 
> My tongue takes the grapes = I savor the grapes.
> My tongue gets the honey = I taste (passively) the honey.
> My tongue gets-involuntarily the spoiled milk = I taste (against my
> desire to do so) the spoiled milk.
> 
> ... and so on.
> 
> For mental states we might have:
> 
> My mind/thoughts take your idea = I am attentive to your idea.
> My mind gets your idea = I understand your idea (but perhaps not
> necessarily agree with it)
> My mind gets-involuntarily your idea = I understand your idea (but I
> wish I didn't).
> My mind/thoughts hold your words = I remember what you said.
> My mind discards your words = I reject what you have said (or are saying).
> My mind has lost your words = I have forgotten what you said.
> My thoughts have lost his face = I don't remember what he looks like.
> 
> So with three root verbs; get, have, give, and affixes for the
> variations mentioned (and possibly other variations as well), by
> naming as agent the sensory channel (including the internal channels
> of mind/thought/memory) a wide range of meanings covering mental
> states and sensory phenomena can be covered.
> 
> Thoughts? (Cross-posting to CBB)
> 
> --gary