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Jörg Rhiemeier wrote:

> quoting R A Brown's:
>
>> quoting Gary Shannon:
>> [...]
>>> Ah, but imagine a future where humans are either extinct,
>> or have, in fact, become slaves to the computers.
>>
>> Not a future I want to imagine. Either of those futures
>> would surely imply a 'lack of moral fiber' on the part of
>> humans - tho the way humans are behaving, the first scenario
>> doesn't require very much imagination  :(
>
> I don't want to imagine such a future, either.  I prefer a future
> where humanity manages to overcome the problems that currently
> endanger our continued existence.  The future history I am working
> on is optimistic, with war, poverty, oppression and environmental
> destruction being ended before the 21st century is over.  I think
> science fiction *can* be a guide to a livable future, though most
> authors miss that opportunity and create apocalyptic visions
> instead.

It's in tune with the times, I think. The relation science keeps with  
the public today seems mostly to deal with hopelessness, and science  
fiction follows suit. The main reason for the awakening from religion  
in the last century is the hope that modern science provided. Reading  
science fiction and other projective literature from the first two  
thirds of the century is really refreshing (Wells has always been a  
favourite of mine), compared to what they offer us today. Hope is  
very essential to the workings of the human mind, and since science  
doesn't take on the role of hope-giver anymore, religion is growing  
again. Most people who abandon religion today do it because they  
don't like traditional morality, i.e. they like to live sinfully.

LEF