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Hi there again!

First of all, I would like to warmly thank Jeff Sheets for the kind suggestion he 
gave about adding IPA to explain what my conlang sounds like.

So basically I will re-post a message I have sent to this list some days ago. 
And here you are my blog address for you to have a look at my conscript for 
Yuelami:

http://marlonkodaka.blogspot.com/ 


1.1	Consonants

There are only thirteen consonant sounds plus one allophone sound:

	B-b J-j K-k L-l M-m N-n R-r S-s T-t V-v X-x Y-y Z-z (Yh-yh) 

	“B” = IPA [b], bamue [bam] “nothing”;
	“K” = IPA [k], kaboa [kabo] “boy, lad”;
“J” = IPA [], jevue [ “grass”;
“M” = IPA [m], matoa [“father”;
“N” = IPA [n], nievo [“foot”;
“R” = IPA [r], ruene [“difficult”;
“S” = IPA [s], asao [“eyesight, vision”;
“T” = IPA [t], voatao [vot“act, action, attitude”
“V” = IPA [v], ave [a“full, filled”
“X” = IPA [kaxao[ka“calling, invocation”
“Y” = IPA [j], yasao [as] “earth”
“Z” = IPA [z], zieno [z“girl”

There also seven digraphs used to represent in writing a shift in pronunciation 
of certain letters because of surrounding consonant sounds:

1. bh = IPA [v]
2. vh = IPA [b]
3. sh = IPA [
4. xh = IPA [s]
5. zh = IPA []
6. jh = IPA [z] 
7. yh = IPA []

Examples:

1) bei- “masculine I” + beitue “to be” = beibheitoa “I am”
    moabue “someone” + bena “whether” = ... moabue bhena “Whether 
someone...”

2) ve- “feminine we” + varue “to want” = vevharoa “we want”
    Evoa “God” + vaji “as well, too” = ...Evoa vhaji “God also...”

3) moa “he” + eisue “to come” = moaseishe “he will come”
    Yasoa “Jesus” + -sie “of” = ...Yasoashie “...of Jesus”

4) laxue “a telephone” + -xue “from, out of” = laxuxhue “from a telephone”

5) kazue “a word” + zeilao “new” = kazue zheilao “a new way”
    bazue “heaven” + -zei “verbal direct object marker” = bazuzhei
   zue- “very” + zubei “big” = zuezhubei “very big”

6) bijue “disease” + jarao “terrible” = bijue jharao “a terrible disease”
    eijue “a horse” + jibao “small = eijue jhibao “a small horse”
    ja- “softening prefix” + jano “aunt” = jajhano “auntie, dear aunt”

7) yu “the” + yasao “earth” = yu yhasao “the earth”   
    etoayue “to destroy” + -yoa “in order to” = etoayuyhoa “in order to 
destroy”
 
There are no “g”, “c”, “d”, “f”, “h” and “p” sounds in standard Yuelami. Note 
that consonant clusters do not exist either.
 
Two important pronunciation rules:

1) In Yuelami, all words end in vowel. When a word is followed by a word 
beginning with a vowel, an “s” is added to end of the previous word, regardless 
of its grammatical function and meaning. 
If there’s an “s” in the last syllable of the previous word and an “s” in the 
second syllable of the next word (because the first syllable is the vowel itself in 
this case), a “t” will come at the end of the word followed by another word 
beginning with a vowel. Examples:

ye “the” + anelo “truth” = yes anelo “the truth”
mo “she” + eisue “to go” = moseishoa “she comes”
busoa “week” + yei...ojei “this” = yei busoat ojei “this week”

2) If a word ends in “i”, “ie”, “u” or “ue” is not needed to add the above-
mentioned linking “s” or “t” (because words never begin with I, IE, U and UE in 
Yuelami, besides S, X, and T). Examples:

	yu “the” + omue “a house” = yu omue “the house”
	risie “a teacher” + eivi “kind” = risie eivi “a kind teacher”
	kaji “beautiful” + etuezo “female friend” = kaji etuezo “a beautiful friend”
	yi “the” + okuesi “two oranges” = yi okuesi the two oranges


1.2	Vowels

There are ten vowel sounds in the Yuelami language:

A – AO – E – EI  – I – IE – O – OA – U – UE 

“A” = IPA [a]; it is always stressed when it comes in the end of a word, e.g.: 
zaka [zaka] “because”, anela [anla] “truly, really”

“AO” = IPA [or [Iis not a diphthong; it is always unstressed when it 
comes in the end of a word, e.g. koarao [kor] or [kor“book”;

“E” = IPA []. It is always stressed when it comes in the end of a word, e.g.:
bove [b“but, however”, leiniete [lent“fast, quick, swift”;

“EI” =IPA [e]; it is always unstressed when it comes in the end of a word, e.g.:
lamei [lame] “great”, zayei [zaje] “dancer”;

“I” = IPA [i]; it is always stressed when it comes in the end of a word, e.g.:
laoni [l“without”, kalani [kalni] or [kalani] “pencil”;

“IE” = IPA [or []it is not a diphthong either. it is always unstressed when 
it comes in the end of a word (an unstressed “i” always becomes a “ie” both in 
pronunciation and spelling), e.g.: lativei [lative] masculine adjective “easy, 
simple”, but latieve [latorlatfeminine adjective “easy, 
simple”, bamie [bam or [bam“kid, child”;

“O” = IPA [; it is always stressed when it comes in the end of a word, e.g.:
bo [b “cow”,naro [nar“woman”, veibueyo 
[vebjj“freedom”;

“OA” = IPA [o]; it is always unstressed when it comes in the end of a word, 
e.g.:
lexazoa [l“king”, zuezhuloa 
[zlrl“big/large man”;

“U” = IPA [u]; it is always unstressed when it comes in the end of a word, 
turning to “ue” in writing, e.g.: zu [zu] “time”, 
kuroa [kuro] “lord” – but kueroayoa [krojo] or [krojo] “to a lord”
mirue [mir] or [mir“person” – but mieruyoa 
[mrurmru
“to a person”
 
“UE” =  IPA [or; when the stress no longer falls on the U, its turns 
into UE. Ex.: yeis etuzoa, [je suzo] “the male friend”, but yeis 
etuezoayoa [je szojo] or [je szojo], to the male friend. 
Therefore, UE turns to U when it becomes stressed. Ex.: 
vamue [vam] or [vam, “everything”, vamuzei beivaroa [vamuzei 
bevaro] 
“I want everything”; 
jiesetue, [] or [] “lamb”, jiesetuxue 
[u] or [u], 
“from a sheep”.

The only diphthongs are the following eight: ay [aj], aoy [or, ey 
[], eiy [ej], oy [, oay [oj] and uy [uj] or [] / j] (unstressed).

1.3	Stress

•	Words ending with  “a”, “e”, “o”, and “i” are always stressed on the last 
syllable. Examples:

atuesa [at “well” (manner adverb)
lietamo [l “fountain” (feminine noun)
kalani [kalani], [kal “pencil” (neuter noun)
nole [n “intelligent” (feminine adjective)

•	Words ending with “ao”, “ei”, “oa”, “ie”, and “ue” are always stressed on 
the penultimate syllable. Examples:

yelao [ “life” (neuter noun)
zumei [zume] “really good” (masculine adjective)
kuxoa [kuo]“servant” (masculine noun)
baymie [bajm], [bajm] “children” (plural neuter noun)

•	Unstressed Yuelami “i” is always pronounced as “i” in the English words 
“lit” and “bid”, or Russian and Polish vowel y, and it changes in spelling to “ie”. 
Examples: 
•	
nimoa [nimo] “prince (masculine noun)” 
and niemo [n] or [n] “princess (feminine)”

mijei [mi “short/brief (masc. adjective)”, 
and mieje [m] or [m]“short/brief (fem. adjective)” 


                majilue [maorma“a magazine” (neuter 
noun)
          and majielujao [malumalu
[malumalu “with a magazine”