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Paul Bartlett skrev 2011-03-15 20.56:
>
> What does "easy enough" mean? 
> Yes, there are some people who, 
> as adults, are not able in 
> practice to master any language 
> other than that which they 
> learned in childhood. A number of 
> years ago, I was familiar with a 
> couple who, sadly and tragically, 
> had two children (they had 
> others) with congenital defects. 
> From their infancy those children 
> were exposed to (General 
> American) English, so they were 
> able to communicate in a basic 
> way. (Again, I say that this is a 
> tragedy.) Would they be able to 
> master any L2 in later life? 
> Obviously not. There are degrees. 
> Certainly there are individuals 
> with normal intelligence who 
> function amazingly well in their 
> L1 who as adults never seem quite 
> able to master an L2, 
> specifically including a conIAL. 
> Yes, some proportion of them 
> might be able to attain some 
> level of competence, but they 
> would not be able to attain 
> complete mastery. Does that mean 
> that conIAL X or conIAL Y is "not 
> easy enough"? Not at all. The 
> blunt fact is that there are some 
> adults who will never be able to 
> master any L2, nat or con, but 
> that does not mean that the more 
> or less simplicity and regularity 
> of a conIAL (Ido, Esperanto, or 
> whatever) is to be disregarded. 
> For those who have any vague 
> facility with any L2 at all, a 
> regular conIAL will be to their 
> advantage. And let us not forget 
> Mario Pei's admonition that 
> almost any language (with an 
> adequate vocabulary for modern 
> affairs) will do if taught 
> universally to young children. In 
> that regard, I consider that a 
> regular conIAL has serious 
> advantages for teaching, 
> particularly if it is to be 
> learned and used by adults until 
> the language millennium arrives.
>
This is most certainly anecdotical 
evidence, but I know some persons 
who have learnt Esperanto in their 
adult years, and who speak the 
language well, as far as I can 
judge. But they do not know any 
ethnic language except for their 
own which they of course have been 
reared in.

Kjell R