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James Chandler skrev 2011-03-18 21.03:
>> This is probably a waste of time, but as I noted earlier, for those
>> who wish to avoid<ĥ>, alternatives are available. I don't worry about
>> it myself, but if you go to
>>
>> http://bertilow.com/pmeg/skribo_elparolo/elparolo/bazaj_reguloj.html
>>
>> and check the bottom of the page, there's a section on the topic,
>> which I've copied below. It substantiates that there are alternatives
>> for words with<ĥ>, though not all are in common use. For myself, I
>> don't remember when I last used ĥoro or eĥo, but I'm aware of koruso
>> and ekoo if I wish to use them instead. I do use kemio and Ĉinio
>> simply because they're in common use.
>> Properly speaking,<ĥ>  hasn't
>> been eliminated or "silenced" (are you actually serious about likening
>> it to a silent letter?); rather, alternative roots have been suggested
>> (a permissible move)
>
> Hmm.. looks a lot like a REFORM to me.  And I seem to remember that those are banned in Esp.
>
>> Anyway, the section in question:
> I read the section at the website and I must say I've rarely seen such a mess.  There is no single rule for eliminating h^ and worse still, for some words it doesn't even seem POSSIBLE to eliminate it.
If my memory doesn't play pranks 
with me I seam to recall that 
people were eliminating ĥ already 
in the 60's. As to myself it 
doesn't bother me to say psiĥologio 
or eĥo, but it appears to be a 
problem for some Esperanto 
speakers. They they can use k or 
indeed ĉ for Ĉinio. Ĥinio I would 
understand as a Slavicism.

Kjell R