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What prompted my remark was this from Padraic:
> Padraic Brown <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
> > We know that language changes over the years -- anyone
> > can read Beowulf
> > and Ancrene Wisse and Trolius and Criseyde and Hamlet
> > and Pride and
> > Prejudice and Red October and can see the change first
> > hand. *What is this
> > change if not the subtle strokes and careful
> > adjustments of a whole race
> > of conlangers? *Not acting as individual artists but as
> > communal builders
> > and renovators of an ever new mode of speech?

I like the analogy with cooking. Everybody eats, but few create.

stevo

On Tue, May 31, 2011 at 1:58 AM, R A Brown <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On 30/05/2011 20:40, Padraic Brown wrote:
>
>> --- On Sun, 5/29/11, MorphemeAddict<[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>>
>> Padraic Brown<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>
>> [snip]
>
>
>>> I think that to be a conlanger one must deliberately
>>> create the new language or part thereof. The
>>> unthinking use of language by most speakers doesn't
>>> make them conlangers.
>>>
>>
>> I don't think either Ray is and I know I am not saying
>> that "everyone is a conlanger" in the sense we usually
>> reserve for the word (a glossopoet).
>>
>
> Quite right - I haven't said that. I've not anything in this
> thread that suggests to me that anyone is saying that.
>
>
> What we're saying is there is not a vast nomans land
>> between conlangs and natlangs.
>>
>
> Quite so - the dividing line between conlangs & natlangs is not IMO a clear
> cut own; there is a fuzzy dividing line at best. Jan, in fact, was the first
> to bring this up.
>
> What seems to have prompted Stevo's remark above IIRC was my quoting from
> that "a living language ... is not constructed to do this", i.e. harmonize
> word-forms and sound-music. I was just intrigued that he referred to living
> natlangs as constructs. It does not, it seems to me, to imply that Tolkien
> considered all who use language to be what we term "conlangers" - indeed the
> title of the article from which the quote was excerpted, "A Secret Vice",
> surely implies quite the opposite!
>
>
> --
> Ray
> ==================================
> http://www.carolandray.plus.com
> ==================================
> Nid rhy hen neb i ddysgu.
> There's none too old to learn.
> [WELSH PROVERB]
>