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On 11/07/2011 12:00, yuri wrote:
> On 11 July 2011 22:53, Peter Bleackley wrote:
>> Over the weekend, I came up with the idea for a case
>> that marks the subject of a ditransitive sentence, as
>> distinct from the subjects of intransitive or
>> monotransitive sentences. I call it the donative. I was
>> playing around with ideas for a topic-comment system
>> with resumptive pronouns at the time, and started
>> wondering what would happen if the resumptive pronouns
>> started fusing with things.
> [snip]
>> Does anyone know of any natlang precendents?
>
> Does the dative case in Latin count as a precedent?

No.

Peter explicitly writes *a case that marks the _subject_ of 
a ditransitive sentence, as distinct from the subjects of 
intransitive or monotransitive sentences. I call it the 
donative*

Also look at Peter's Nominative/Donative system. If I've
correctly understood Peter's (which you snipped):

>> Ditransitive
>> A=Don, T=Acc, R=Nom

        Jane gave John a book
Latin: NOM. VERB DAT.  ACC.
Peter: DON. VERB NOM.  ACC.

I.e. with ditransitive verbs the Peter's system _donative_ 
takes the place of the Latin nominative, and the Latin 
dative is expressed by the nominative.

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On 11/07/2011 12:15, Eugene Oh wrote:
 > In the ergative system wouldn't all agents be marked with
 > the ergative? That's my understanding of "ergative".

Maybe - but one may as well equally say "In the 
nominative-accusative systems wouldn't all agents be marked 
as nominative?"

The point is, as I understand it, that Peter is suggesting
a scheme in which, with *ditransitive* verbs, the agent is
expressed by the Donative case, whether the language is a 
nominative-accusative or an ergative one.

 >> Ergative/donative system
 >> Intransitive
 >> S=Abs
 >> Monotransitive
 >> A=Erg, P=Abs
 >> Ditransitive
 >> A=Don, P=Abs, R=??? (Could be Abs as well, could be 
something else entirely)

Surely, on the analogy of the Nominative/Donative system 
above, wouldn't it be:
  A=Don, P=Abs, R=Erg    ?

Interesting idea   :)

-- 
Ray
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