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On 14 July 2011 18:45, Dirk Elzinga <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> My surname is pronounced by (American) English speakers in one of two ways:
> [ˈɛlziŋə(ɹ)] and [ɛlˈzɪŋɡə]. When I lived in Germany, it was pronounced
> [ˈɛlt͡siŋa]. In Frisian (its language of origin) and Dutch it is pronounced
> [ˈɛlziŋxa]. I answer to all of them (though I have yet to be addressed by a
> Frisian :-)). I'm not particularly fussy about it; I figure people will
> pronounce it in a way that is most comfortable for them--in a way that
> conforms to the phonotactics of their native language, and I'm fine with
> that. So I don't understand why people should insist that I must pronounce
> their foreign name according to the rules of that foreign language rather
> than letting me use my own language to guide my pronunciation *when we are
> speaking my language*. I'm a big fan of phonological accomodation :-), and
> I
> certainly don't intend any disrespect by doing it to someone's name.
>
>
But those different pronunciations aren't that different from the one you go
by, are they? I don't ask people to get the [ʁ] in my name exactly right.
Just use the rhotic or sound that comes closest in your language. But don't
transform my name into something else. Some people have tried to call me
"Christopher", and I don't answer to that. That's the equivalent of my name
in English, but I was not named in English. And I will *always* correct
people who want to pronounce my last name as [ˈɡɹɑndsajə(ɹ)] or whatever
that English word is pronounced like. It's OK if you can't pronounce the
rhotic or the nasal vowel, but it's not difficult to at least approximate
the right pronunciation ([ɡʁɑ̃ˈsiʁ]). I'm already happy with [ɡɹɑnˈsiːə(ɹ)].
It's not a matter of forcing people to pronounce one's name according to the
rules of a foreign language (for them). It's a matter of using my name,
rather than somebody else's.
-- 
Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.

http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com/
http://www.christophoronomicon.nl/