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I was thinking, maybe the best way to go about creating a universal alphabet is to produce one like Blissymbolics, only to a greater level of abstraction. If we produce an inventory of universally (or, at least, kind of agreeable) recognised abstract symbols which combine vertically, like Chinese scripts, to produce whole concepts, with case, tense, person, etc encoded in relatively abstract forms. This would mean that concepts could be communicated across language boundaries, with no need for phonetic differences to get in the way, with native grammar functions provided for (so we have "dative", "prohibitive" "allative" built in, but not used by languages that don't need them. There is, of course, a few big difficulties like, how do you choose which symbols for which concepts? And who do we choose how they encode? Like the alethiometer from "Northern Lights", the symbol of the sword does not necessarily suggest "The Catholic Church" nor the owl "Fear" (although, after having watched too much Twin Peaks, owls do rather freak me out now). The other big difficulty I foresee is when it comes to reading: that having to convert abstract symbols into your spoken tongue is difficult. I don't know if the issue is still around, but I'm fairly certain we "think" in the language we speak. I for one find it difficult to switch between English thinking and Spanish thinking. It might work though as a language for diplomacy and business, whereas everyday communication is done in native languages. I can imagine learning it as one learns to be a stenographer or how to use a particular computer language. I'm guessing I'm drifting into prohibited topics.

Thoughts:
male as upwards triangle, female as downwards triangle
water as wavy line horizontal (and maybe fire, air and earth as "The Fifth Element" film)
bird or flight as a sort of "m" shape
world as a circle

etc, etc, corny-etc