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 >   What if the TEI now devoted its energies and financial resources to
 > sponsoring community open source tool building efforts.

I would really welcome this. It's remarkably difficult to get 
institutional support for generic tool-building these days; everything 
has to be tied to a specific project, or a specific grant, with no 
prospect of realistic broader application and no hope of continued 
development and support.

Cheers,
Martin

On 11-08-24 06:47 AM, Doug Reside wrote:
> I think one way of answering Trevor's call to focus on translation is
> to respond with more focused community tool building.  The desire of
> the TEI to be software agnostic is laudable, but taken too far it
> simply isolates the standard.  We have too few widely-used tools for
> dealing with markup once it's produced.  Most HTML encodings aren't
> tested with W3C validators, but by sticking in two or three browsers
> and seeing what comes up.  This is, of course, the root of some
> problems in HTML, but it's also evidence that what most want/need is
> not markup that is theoretically valid, but markup that _works_.
>
>   What if the TEI now devoted its energies and financial resources to
> sponsoring community open source tool building efforts.  As the
> community begins designing a few "browsers" (not only ones for simple
> presentation but also for search and visualization), I think we will
> better understand how to restrict (and possibly expand) our standard.
> There have been several TEI tools developed by small, relatively
> closed development efforts in the past (I've been a part of a few),
> but I'm unaware of any multi-institutional open source effort not
> associated with (and limited to the timing of) a particular grant.
>
> In short, if the community looked more like the Mozilla foundation
> than the W3C (maybe only for a bit), I think we'd better understand
> our own needs.
>
> Doug
>

-- 
Martin Holmes
University of Victoria Humanities Computing and Media Centre
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