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Folks,

I have a small XSLT project that I need completed by mid-September for 
which I would like to hire a freelancer.  (Well, I would love to do it 
the work myself, but I just don't have the time in the next month.)  If 
you are interested, please read on; if you know someone else who might 
be, please forward this message.

The Journal of the Abraham Lincoln Association makes their articles 
available online at http://www.historycooperative.org/jalaindex.html , 
but this site will stop hosting the content soon, so MPublishing at the 
University of Michigan Library (where I work) is taking over this 
publication.  I need to migrate this ugly though *extremely regular* 
HTML into something like Level 3 according to the Best Practices for TEI 
in Libraries guidelines ( 
http://www.tei-c.org/SIG/Libraries/teiinlibraries/main-driver.html#level-3-content 
).  More specifically:

* Name files just as the HTML files are named but ending in ".xml" 
instead of ".html".
* Omit the teiHeader, or stick in something bare-bones for validation 
purposes.  (We store our header data in a database and export into 
headers, which we attach to the bodies at indexing time.)
* Omit the article genre (like "Review Essay") if it appears.  This will 
be handled in our metadata.
* Use titlePage/docTitle/titlePart for the article title.
* Use titlePage/docAuthor for the article author.
* Use numbered divs.
* Encode notes at point of reference.
* Use @rend on <hi> with the same values created by docxtotei (part of 
http://wiki.tei-c.org/index.php/Tei-xsl ) -- if you struggle with this, 
give me a list of styles you encounter and I'll tell you the appropriate 
@rend values.
* Don't use <lb/>.
* Include @n on each <p> that displays in the right margin in the HTML.
* When possible, take advantage of the XML comments in the HTML, which 
provide additional semantic markup that will translate well into TEI. 
If you can map to an element not in Level 3 (like <bibl>), please just 
go ahead and insert it.

I imagine a single XSLT stylesheet could do the trick for all of the 
articles.  This seems to me to be a simple, straightforward project for 
someone with intermediate XSLT skills.

I am happy to quickly review samples of your work before the deadline, 
but I'm afraid I don't have time to debug your XSLT code.

If you are still interested, please email me by Friday, Sept. 2 naming 
your price for converting all articles published in this journal.  I 
will notify the person I select on Saturday, Sept. 3 and expect the work 
to be completed by Fri., Sept. 16.  If you are selected, you'll need to 
provide your SSN or other US Taxpayer Identification Number if you have 
it to the University of Michigan.

Despite the short notice, I do hope someone out there will find this a 
worthwhile project!  Please let me know if you have any questions,

Kevin