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--- On Wed, 8/31/11, Padraic Brown <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> --- On Wed, 8/31/11, Christophe
> Grandsire-Koevoets <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> 
> > Coincidentally, I'm currently trying to
> create-discover
> > (you get my drift)
> > the word for "work" in Moten. To do so, I've had a
> look at
> > how various
> > languages translate "work", and what the etymology of
> those
> > words are.
> > Besides the very boring words derived from words
> meaning
> > "action", "act",
> > "make", we've got words originally meaning "torture"
> > (French "travail", from
> > Latin "tripalium"), "trouble", "agony", "ordeal"
> (Hungarian
> > "munka" and
> > Romanian "muncă", both from Slavic), "hardship",
> > "suffering" (German
> > "Arbeit") and "slavery" (Modern Greek
> "δουλειά":
> > work, job is just one
> > accent position away from "δουλεία": slavery,
> and
> > derived from it). The old
> > European opinion on the value of work is quite clear,
> > methinks :P .
> 

> When one is sentenced to isfiare, that generally means
> mining, quarrying
> or running the treadmills under one of Pharaoh's golden
> Wonderworks....

I was thinking of something like that too.....Kash has sonjep 'a human-powered wheel device for drawing water, milling grain, etc.' and a derived compound kratonjep 'to perform boring or repetitious tasks', can also refer to the daily grind, the rat race etc. (< haran (ri) sonjep 'walk on the sonjep').  My inspiration was Spanish 'dar vueltas a la noria' which IIRC also refers to working a wheel for drawing water.