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On Sat, Sep 24, 2011 at 12:09 PM, Sam Stutter <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> (Without having looked into this at all) Language is both wonderful and
> strange, I'm sure somewhere it might occur.
>
> In English we can accept that someone may be a "giver" or "doer" and others
> are "experiencer" or "receiver", that people can be different depending upon
> their role in an action, but doesn't it require a Theseus' Ship view of the
> world to accept that people can be different depending upon when they do an
> action.
>
> I have the job of doctor. You are injured. I heal you. You have the job of
> doctor. I am injured. You heal me. (To a western european ear, this seems
> perfectly normal and "job" is marked with case)
>
> I was who I was yesterday. The boat was the boat yesterday. I saw the boat.
> I am who I am today. The boat is the boat today. A different me (to the me
> yesterday) sees a different boat (to the boat yesterday). (In terms of
> historical western culture, based upon the assumptions that everything was
> created *as is* - the stars don't change, evolution doesn't happen - this is
> philosophically unusual)
>
> > I decided it would be a useful system for timetravellers, especially with
> the addition of distinction between position along one's personal timeline &
> position in objective time.
>
>
> Whoever the speakers are, the environment in which their language developed
> would have had such noticeable and rapid changes as to cause them to easily
> perceive a universe which evolved and developed, and have a sense of the
> fact that who they wake up today as is not identical to the person who fell
> asleep yesterday.
>
>
So . . . Earth?

-- 
Second Person, a chapbook of poetry by Patrick Dunn, is now available for
pre-order from Finishing Line
Press<http://www.finishinglinepress.com/NewReleasesandForthcomingTitles.htm>.