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I'm not Spanish, like Roberto, but when I speak Castellano I've always pronounced "x" as /ks/, as do my family, who are, hence, "expreso", "expositor", etc. It's most obvious in road signs in Cataluña and Valencia, where place names are spelt differently to how they are on any normal map (I hate driving in Spain!). 

BTW, Roberto, I've always meant to ask why streets have names in up to three languages, with only one being known to the people who live on it, only one marked on street signs and only one known to map makers :) 

On 22 Sep 2011, at 14:15, Hugo Cesar de Castro Carneiro wrote:

> ¡Hola Roberto!
> 
> I thought spaniards pronounced "x" as [ʃ] depending on its place in a word.
> 
> First, because Basques also use "x" as [ʃ] in addition to the digraph "tx"
> pronounced [tʃ]. Valencian and Catalan people also use "x" as [ʃ] in cluster
> "eix" (mateixa, conèixer etc), and due to two football (soccer) players from
> these regions, Xavi (from Tarrasa) and Xabi Alonso (from Tolosa), I thought
> that even Castillian people would see "x" in some cases as [ʃ].
> 
> The names Xavi and Xabi that are from Xavier and Xabier, with almost the
> same pronunciation of Galician Xavier and different from Castillian Javier
> (sound change [ʃ] to [x], as in xefe > jefe (boss, chef) and dexar > dejar
> (to let)).
> 
> 2011/9/22 Roberto Suárez Soto <[log in to unmask]>
> 
>> 2011/9/21 Gary Shannon <[log in to unmask]>
>> 
>> I like the "txC" combo I used in Txtana /ʧ-tana/. It's basically like
>>> saying "chit" (or "chip" or "chik" depending of what consonant C is)
>>> without vocalizing the vowel. The letter "X" is "SH" (ʃ).
>>> 
>> 
>>    Using "x" for "sh" is also the norm in Galician (not a conlang ;-)).
>> Though many of the non-galician spaniards don't know, and pronounce it like
>> /ks/ (the norm in spanish castillian), /s/ or /C/ (I think; it's like
>> spanish "ch"). It makes for some fun when the state TV channel has news
>> about the "Xunta de Galicia" :-)
>> 
>> --
>>       Roberto Suárez Soto
>>