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I was aware that this sort of thing happened in some languages, but this
isn't exactly what Stevo was asking.  He was wanting an example of a
language where the one term is *derived* from the other, not where they are
identical.  Still this is plenty weird enough.  Chinese speakers woner how
we get by with so few words for aunt/uncle/cousin and the like.  I wonder
how you manage when your grandfather and your grandson have the same label.
Even so, I did some of this sort of thing in Graavgaaln where there are
words that are glossed as "relative of the first degree," "relative of the
second degree," etc. with "degrees" of relatedness being defined elsewhere.
IIRC father and son would both be first degree. Grandfather, grandson and
sibling were all second degree.  Nephew greatgrandfather, greatgrandson, and
1st cousin were all third degree.  But at this remove, I could be quite
wrong on some of the details.

Adam

On Wed, Sep 28, 2011 at 9:49 AM, Dirk Elzinga <[log in to unmask]>wrote:

> Several Uto-Aztecan languages do this. For example, Shoshoni has:
>
> kɨnu 'father's father; man's son's child'
> toko 'mother's father; man's daughter's child'
> huttsi 'father's mother; woman's son's child'
> kaku 'mother's mother; woman's daughter's child'
>
> ata 'mother's brother; man's sister's child'
> paha 'father's sister; nephew or niece of a woman'
>
> tsoo 'great-grandparent; great-grandchild'
>
> There are other kin terms, but I can't find reciprocal meanings for them.
>
> Dirk
>
> On Tue, Sep 27, 2011 at 11:21 PM, MorphemeAddict <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
> > Does anyone know of a natlang that treats relationships such as
> father/son,
> > grandfather/grandson, or single man (bachelor)/husband/widower as inverse
> > relationships, by which I mean that one of the pair/group is taken as
> basic
> > and the other(s) are formed by marking the basic form?
> >
> > In my Zbansut, father is xrot (xro-t), son is xrotat (xro-ta-t).
> > Grandfather
> > is krit (kri-t), grandson is kritat (kri-ta-t). A never-married man is
> škit
> > (ški-t), a married man (husband) is škitat (ški-ta-t), and a
> > no-longer-married man (usually widower) is a škinet (ški-ne-t).
> >
> > stevo
> >
>