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2011/9/23 Roberto Suárez Soto <[log in to unmask]>

>
>
> > But that's what I am saying "tx" is [tʃ], which is "t" + "x" [t] + [ʃ].
> >
>
>     Understood. I somehow thought that "ch" was only one sound, but it
> seems
> I was wrong.
>
>
Actually, you're not wrong: affricates *are* one sound, a sound that starts
as a stop and ends as a fricative (basically, they are the consonantal
equivalent of diphthongs). But when describing them using the IPA, they are
described using two symbols: the symbol of the stop they start as, and the
symbol of the fricative they end up as. Officially, you're supposed to add a
tie-bar on top of them, to indicate that they are really one sound rather
than two in succession, but in practice the tie-bar is difficult to input
and fonts often get the placement wrong, so people don't bother, especially
since in most languages affricates do not contrast with the corresponding
stop+fricative combination (though some do, like Polish). IPA used to have
some ligatures for affricates (like ʧ), but they are deprecated (if only
because only six of the possible affricates had a special character).

The Wikipedia article about affricates is quite good, I advise you to read
it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affricate_consonant
-- 
Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.

http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com/
http://www.christophoronomicon.nl/