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I don't see a fricative release as less natural than a plosive release :
stops with a plosive release are called plosives, stops with a fricative
release are called affricates, and some stops are unreleased, but all are
single sounds.

I'm not a native speaker, but Catalan X is pronounced like English or
Castilian CH initially, and the same sound is written TX medially and IG
finally.  The digraph IX is pronounced like English SH non-initially, and I
don't think it can be written initially.

On Fri, Sep 23, 2011 at 7:40 AM, Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> 2011/9/23 Roberto Suárez Soto <[log in to unmask]>
>
> >
> >
> > > But that's what I am saying "tx" is [tʃ], which is "t" + "x" [t] + [ʃ].
> > >
> >
> >     Understood. I somehow thought that "ch" was only one sound, but it
> > seems
> > I was wrong.
> >
> >
> Actually, you're not wrong: affricates *are* one sound, a sound that starts
> as a stop and ends as a fricative (basically, they are the consonantal
> equivalent of diphthongs). But when describing them using the IPA, they are
> described using two symbols: the symbol of the stop they start as, and the
> symbol of the fricative they end up as. Officially, you're supposed to add
> a
> tie-bar on top of them, to indicate that they are really one sound rather
> than two in succession, but in practice the tie-bar is difficult to input
> and fonts often get the placement wrong, so people don't bother, especially
> since in most languages affricates do not contrast with the corresponding
> stop+fricative combination (though some do, like Polish). IPA used to have
> some ligatures for affricates (like ʧ), but they are deprecated (if only
> because only six of the possible affricates had a special character).
>
> The Wikipedia article about affricates is quite good, I advise you to read
> it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affricate_consonant
> --
> Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.
>
> http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com/
> http://www.christophoronomicon.nl/
>