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2011/9/22 Roberto Suárez Soto <[log in to unmask]>

> 2011/9/22 Adam Walker <[log in to unmask]>
>
> You live in Galicia?  Cool.
>
>
>    And rainy :-)
>
>
> > Galicain. The one thing that bothered me all the way throu was wondering
> > what the differences were between L, LL and LH, since nh was clearly
> > equivallant to Castilian ñ, I first though lh must be equivallant to
> > Castillian ll and Galician was following a Portugese-esque spelling
> > convention (which makes perfect sense), but then when LL started popping
> > up,
> > I realized that either the Galicians liked multiple options for spelling
> > the
> > same sounds, or Galician has three l-like liquids.
> >
>
>    That's because Galician itself is "sandwiched" between Castillian and
> Portuguese, and there are two conflicting "schools of thought" regarding to
> which it should be most similar to: the "lusistas" (the ones that proclaim
> that it should be more similar to Portuguese) and the "normativos" (who
> support a more latin, slightly more similar to Castillian version, which is
> the official one in the government). The "real Galician" is lost between
> those two extremes and the many dialectal variations.
>
>    So, to answer your question: officially, Galician uses "ñ" and "ll"
> ("mariñeiro" = "sailor", "baralla" = "deck of cards"). But the lusistas
> propose "nh" and "lh" instead, like in Portuguese. I think they're both
> allowed in practice, but beware: using the Portuguese form subtly implies a
> political affinity with the nationalist left-wing. Use with caution :-)
>
> --
>        Roberto Suárez Soto
>


So why would BOTH conventions be applied in a single book by one author?
Have you read _Cartas de Inverno_?  Do you know what I'm talking about?  I
am now more confused than ever (which is a common state of affairs for
me!).  Maybe I should go back and see if one set of the spellings is used in
the narrators text and the other in the text he quotes from his
"correspondant."  If so, I may have completely missed a very political
subtext.

Adam