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It's very early here and my coffee's just kicking in, but aren't you
describing a highly analytic, not a highly synthetic, language?  One
morpheme per word sounds very analytic to me.


On Fri, Oct 14, 2011 at 10:26 PM, Hugo Cesar de Castro Carneiro <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Hej conlangers,
>
> I am creating a very synthetic language. It is somewhat more synthetic than
> an affixal polysynthetic language and maybe as synthetic as or even less
> synthetic than a compositional polysynthetic one.
>
> Compositional polysynthetic languages usually have more than one morpheme
> per word. My conlang, on the other hand, will have only one.
>
> What can make my conlang as synthetic as (or as almost synthetic as) a
> compositional polysynthetic language is that there will not be any closed
> class word in my conlang. There will be no adposition, no conjunction, no
> pronoun (of any kind) and so on. Because of this lack of closed class
> words,
> it is very difficult to build subordinate clauses.
>
> My first attempt to create noun subordinate clauses was to transform the
> verb of subordinate clause into a noun, so I would transform "I saw you
> hugging that girl" into "I saw your hug upon that girl". I create these
> sentences with a nominalized verb by using the possessive case for the
> agent
> (the one that owns the action) and the genitive case for the patient
> (simply
> an object, a complement to that action).
>
> But this proved to be very awkward. To have verbs in coordinate and in main
> clauses, but nouns in subordinates? This proves even more awkward as one
> starts to create embedded subordinate clauses.
>
>
> I tried to use a verb in the subordinate clauses, but I could not find an
> elegant solution.
>
>
> This gets worse when I want to create sentences with modal verbs. "I want
> to
> sing that song" turns into "I want my singing upon that song", or even "I
> want to let you get out alone" turning into "I want my letting upon your
> alone out-getting".
>
>
> At last, I also have a special constructions for consecutive coordinate
> clauses (one when the agent of the first clause is the experiencer of the
> second, and one when the patient of the first is the experiencer of the
> second). The constructions are:
> 1. The woman lost her dog and cried, which becomes, Lose dog.her.ACC
> woman.ABS cry (ACC = accusative, ABS = absolutive, there is neither tense
> nor mood, this will be represent with periphrastic constructions)
> 2. The man pulled the door and it opened, which becomes, Pull man.ERG
> door.ABS open (ERG = ergative).
>
> The aforementioned constructions were created to supress the lack of
> pronouns (It will be hard to create references, as the "it" in the second
> sentence).
>
>
> I hope someone can help me with this problem,
>
> Best Regards to y'all conlagers,
> Hugo Cesar
>



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