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Rejistanis have to expression 'ut esaku'het (to stop the 
employment) on a high level of formality (if you use the active, it 
was the decision of the employee either via failing hard or his own 
free will, ie: Syku mi'ut esaku'het) if passive it was because of 
downsizing, outsourcing or other external reasons (example: Syku 
mi'rala'ut esaku'het). The lower level of formality actually translates 
a German expression (intentionally because I like it) 'rala'isa (which 
is the passive of 'isa for to go), calquing gegangen werden. This 
does indicate that the employee was let go without any indication 
as of why (example: Syku mi'rala'isa.)

On Tuesday 29 November 2011 01:51:11 Scott Hlad wrote:
> A few years ago, I was in a Canada-Alberta Service Centre. This is 
a
> combined service centre between the province and federal 
government where
> one can access specific services germane to either government. 
I looked
> over to the section where one applies for unemployment 
benefits. There was
> a video running that had information for people who had been 
laid off.
> When the French version started, I learned that the term for laid 
off in
> French (at least in Canada) is “mettre à pieds”. I have often 
wondered how
> this is rendered in other languages. How is this rendered in 
other
> languages both nat- and con-?
> 
> Scotto