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> I think if I were starting an encoding project now, I'd avoid using
> @rend entirely and only allow @rendition. Poor @rend seems so
> inadequately specified, and so variably used, that it adds rather
> little to the encoding...

Well, that may be OK for you, but I think it is bad advice in the
general case. @rend is thankfully not over specified, so I have a
mechanism to describe those renditional features of my documents that
are important to me in a manner that I can process, whether or not
CSS has a property-value pair that does what I want. That is, I'm not
wearing a TEI or CSS straight-jacket.

That said, there are lots of times when CSS, XSLFO, or some other
existing scheme already declares the kinds of description I want. In
those cases there are obvious benefits to using @rendition.

But as you start an encoding project, you don't even yet know what
features are important. To tie yourself down by saying "I'm only
going to describe renditional features that other people have already
thought of as important for web display" may be appropriate in some
cases, but in others may be shooting your project in the proverbial
foot.