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On 20/01/12 06:00, Lou Burnard wrote:
> On 19/01/12 15:48, David Sewell wrote:
>> A quick search of old Usenet and HUMANIST postings via Google suggests
>> that it
>> was Michael Hart who popularized the term "etext" in our sense, and it
>> was
>> certainly in use by the late 1980s with reference to Project
>> Gutenberg. (The
>> oldest citation in the online OED is from 1990, with a reference to
>> Gutenberg.)
>> I wonder if Hart was indeed the originator of the usage, and when?
>>
>
> The Oxford Text Archive, that unsung predecessor of the late Mr Hart,
> was originally named the "oxford archive of electronic literature", and
> certainly used the term "electronic text" consistently during all of its
> publications. In the late 1980s or early 90s I am sure there is ample
> evidence of people bemoaning the "e-" prefix as a deplorable neologism.
>
> If memory serves, there is an early report called "what is an e-book"
> for example, which specifically defines that term distinct from the
> OTA's primary concerns: an "e-book" was a published book for reading on
> an "e-book reader" whereas an electronic text was a digitized textual
> resource for research use only.

It's not used in "As We May Think," which just calls things 'books'

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1945/07/as-we-may-think/3881/?single_page=true

cheers
stuart
-- 
Stuart Yeates
Library Technology Services http://www.victoria.ac.nz/library/