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On Wed, Jan 25, 2012 at 12:50 PM, Charlie Brickner
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> On Wed, 18 Jan 2012 23:26:37 +0000, Sam Stutter <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
>>Just been skimming through Lonely Planet guides on Amazon. 2 things spring
> to mind:
>>
>>1) does anyone know what gets covered in the "Language" section? I've only
> managed to scrape a couple of pages from the Cuba edition. Which makes for
> a good basic level Conlang test: can it state "I have altitude sickness"
> and "how long can I park here?". I'm thinking of using this as a basis for a
> short and friendly phrase book.
>>
>
> I own a number of "guide books" that I inherited from my father.  They were
> published by the War Department c. 1943.  Besides standard phrases such
> as "Good morning," "What is your name?", "Are you hungry?", etc., there are
> many other phrases which every well-rounded guide book should have.
>
> Are you a bombardier, gunner, parachutist, rifleman?
> How many men in your unit?
> Where's the airfield?
> What color were their uniforms?
> How many machine guns are there?
> Have the troops been laying mines?
>
> I think you get the drift.
>
> I have them in the following languages: Russian (3), Thai, Swedish,
> Portuguese, Norwegian, Greek, Turkish, Malay, Japanese, Italian (3),
> Hindustani, French (3), Burmese, and North African Arabic.
>
> I'm gradually cleaning out my library.  If any of you are interested in these
> guidebooks, contact me offline.  I'd be glad to send them to you merely for
> the cost of postage.

Heh, my dad learned Russian at the Defense Language Institute. He
likes to say he had the vocabulary of a four-year-old Major General.