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简体 is what I learned, and there is nothing wrong with it.  I will probably
learn traditional eventually, since my 嫂子 (sister-in-law, specifically my
older brother's wife) is from Taiwan, but I don't hold one over the other.
 Traditional is not the "original" or any such thing, it simply hews closer
to kaishu forms, whereas simplified draws from some of the more cursive
calligraphy styles.  Both are print forms that are not much adhered to in
adult handwriting.

2012/1/28 Douglas Koller <[log in to unmask]>

> > Date: Sat, 28 Jan 2012 00:16:14 -0500
> > From: [log in to unmask]
> > Subject: Re: Happy New Year
> > To: [log in to unmask]
>
> > That can be tricky. 和,跟,与 can all be used to mean "and" -- varying only
> in
> > register. Of course, the first two have other meanings.
>
> 與 has the meaning of "give", which also emerges in Japanese 与える
>
> Really, George, 簡體? ;) Man up, it's going to be a 龍 year.
>
> And stevo, does "intent(ion)" work as a better gloss for 意, as opposed to
> "idea"?
>
> Kou
>