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--- On Sun, 2/19/12, Adam Walker <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> 2000~3000? I would consider that a straight jacket!  

Hear hear! Shall we excorticate the lot of em? ;)

> But then, I probably use more than twice that many words in mundane
> conversation.

A knowing fellow, thou!

> I rejoice every time I meet a new word ~ in any language.

How about "dribbings"? -- The last drops of milk drawn from the teat after
milking. Or "cratch"? -- an openwork frame for holding bottles, etc. or
hay for animals or in order to extend the length / storage capacity of
your truck. Or "clarty"? -- sticky, underdone as of batter. Or "knubble"? 
-- to wrap anything up shabbily into a wad. Or "mopuses"? -- money. Or
"sosh"? -- to dip and careen in flight. Or "pink and shank"? -- one who
is early to rise and late to bed. Or "shommacks"? -- an untidy, slovenly
fellow. Or "thrave" / "thrave along"? -- a throng of people; to gather in
a mob.

Padraic

> Adam
> 
> On 2/19/12, Gary Shannon <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> > I agree that English has too many words. While I
> wouldn't take it as
> > far as Toki Pona or Ogden's Basic English, I do believe
> that a fixed,
> > closed vocabulary of 2,000 to 3,000 words would be
> plenty for a rich
> > and expressive language.
> >
> > --gary
> >
> > On Sun, Feb 19, 2012 at 9:39 AM, Larry Sulky <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> >> Nikolay, as a non-native speaker, your grasp on
> 10,700 English words is
> >> impressive. (English has too many words anyway! ;-)
> )
> >>
> >
>