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>On Thu, Feb 23, 2012 at 5:01 PM, Larry Sulky wrote:
>
>> The financial heads in my company use "spend" as a noun ("an amount
>> spent"). I'm trying to convince them that, following the pattern:
>>
>> "lend", "lent", "loan" // "spend", "spent",...
>>
>> the word they're looking for is "spoan".
>>
>>
>That clearly gives us "send" > "sent" > "soan" as a catch-all noun covering
>email, snailmail, etc. Also "rend" > "rent" > "roan" for something that has
>been torn up, "moan" for something that has been fixed, and "boan" for
>something made crooked.
>
>-lp

Well if we're going outside of verb declension and into derivational
morphology, my fave is the nominal suffix *-iT, as seen in pairs like strong
: strength, young : youth, heal : health, high : height, true : truth…
• eldth "age" (< old)
• wrength "degree of wrongness"
• sherth "degree of shortness"
• louth /lu:T/ "degree of lowness"
• tealth /tElT/ "degree of tealness"
• wigh "heavy" (backformation < weight)

—J.