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We can imagine a completely periphrastic variety of English, with
 - past in "did"
 - perfect in "have"
 - progressive in "are"
 - future in "will"
 - conditional in "would"
 - a few others, like a verbal noun in "to"
all followed by the bare verb, and no other verb forms.

On Fri, Feb 24, 2012 at 10:11 AM, MorphemeAddict <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> There is already a perfectly regular past tense in English: did + verb. It
> sounds clunky if used all the time, but it's regular. It's also emphatic,
> so something else to be aware of. (Of course, "did" itself is not regular,
> but it's the same form in all numbers and persons, so it doesn't matter.)
>
> stevo
>
> On Fri, Feb 24, 2012 at 12:29 AM, Ian Spolarich <[log in to unmask]
> >wrote:
>
> > I like "rin.." It makes me think of someone saying "He dun' rin all da
> way
> > home!"
> >
> > I tend to avoid the use of unknown past forms of verbs, in general. But I
> > would definitely appreciate a more regular system of tense changes in
> > English. In one of my conlangs that had vowel harmony, the change in
> tense
> > was shown through a variation in vowels, e.g., _u tiri_ "I have" becomes
> _u
> > turu_ "I had." While this is impossible in English, it's cool.
> >
> > You could have a pattern like so:
> > (prs.) , ablaut and/or -n , -/ot/
> > Write, written, wrote
> > Run, ran, ront?
> > Glide, gliden, glodt/glot?
> > Have, haden, hodt
> > Wear, wearn, wornt (this is my favorite)
> > Make, maen, mokt
> > usw.
> >
> > Today I had to try saying "Cape Cod" about ten times before I got it
> right,
> > the first few went something like "Cape of God" and "Kate Cot" and "Make
> > Pod", oh dear...
> >
> > -Ian
> >
> > On 23 February 2012 22:37, Matthew Turnbull <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >
> > > Glid isn't standard english...I never knew... Add another non-standard
> > > idolectal feature to my list
> > >
> > > On 2/23/12, Garth Wallace <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > > > On Thu, Feb 23, 2012 at 6:42 PM, J. Jocordy <[log in to unmask]>
> > wrote:
> > > >> A prog rock band named Gong has an excellent song called "I Never
> Glid
> > > >> Before."
> > > >> Therefore, it must be glid. Gong is always right!
> > > >>
> > > >> (OT: Speaking of prog rock, I just discovered this band called
> Magma.
> > > They
> > > >> made
> > > >> a conlang for their lyrics called Kobaďan. Apparently Kobaďan is
> > "based
> > > on
> > > >> elements of Slavic-Germanic languages and the scat-yodelling vocal
> > style
> > > >> of Leon Thomas," which is about the best description of a conlang
> I've
> > > >> ever
> > > >> heard.)
> > > >
> > > > I love Magma, but calling Kobaian a conlang may be pushing it.
> There's
> > > > no syntax, really. Supposedly the lyrics tell a story, but it's hard
> > > > to believe the repetitive chanting conveys any sort of narrative.
> > > >
> > > > It does have some of the coolest diacritics, though.
> > > >
> > >
> > > --
> > > Sent from my mobile device
> > >
> >
>