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I just hit this in my ancient Greek lessons.  Evidently, question words
have an o- prefix when used in indirect speech.

On Mon, Feb 27, 2012 at 10:36 AM, Jim Henry <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> How do information-question words (like "who", "where" etc. in
> English) work cross-linguistically in indirect speech and subordinate
> or relative clauses?  Especially in languages where relativizers don't
> have the same form as question-words, as in English?
>
> For instance, in the equivalents of:
>
> 1. Where is the restroom?
>
> 2. "Where is the restroom?" he asked.
>
> 3. He asked where the restroom was.
>
> 4. I didn't know where the restroom was.
>
> --- would your conlang, or the natlangs you're familiar with, use the
> same word for "where" in each case?  Would #3 and/or #4 use a
> relativizer instead of an interrogative, or would a relative "where"
> be restricted to situations like
>
> 5. This is the house where Shakespeare was born.
>
> gj-zym-byn has distinct relativizers and interrogative particles.  So
> far it uses the interrogative in sentences like #1 and #2, and the
> relativizer in ones like #5, but I'm not sure what's the best/most
> natural way to handle #3 and #4; I'm leaning toward using the
> interrogative for #3 and maybe for #4 as well, but I can see reasons
> for using the relativizer instead, especially for #4 and maybe for #3.
>
> --
> Jim Henry
> http://www.pobox.com/~jimhenry/
>



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