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Thank you everyone for responding. This question actually came about from my six-year-old daughter. Earlier today she was trying to say "Look at this picture that I drew" but it came out "Look at this picture that I drawed".

Anyway, I've received some pretty good feedback on here but it leads me to inquire about vowels. I understand the basic concept of front/back, open/close, roundness but I still have trouble discerning what's what in audial language. I don't seem to be able to pick up on the minute differences just from hearing them. Does anyone know of any tools or methods of practice that could help me with this?

Thanks
Brian
Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 29, 2012, at 16:18, Patrick Dunn <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Brian,
> 
> I believe the general term is "alternation" or "apophony" but each kind has
> its own name.  If a vowel gets fronted, for example, that umlaut.  If it's
> a series of vowels that are lengthened in particular ways, that's ablaut.
> "sing, sang, sung" in English is ablaut.  But man/men is umlaut.
> 
> In many languages, apophony is perfectly regular -- including in Old
> English.  It's only irregular in contemporary English because of sound
> change.
> 
> 
> 
> On Wed, Feb 29, 2012 at 4:13 PM, Brian Woodward <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
>> What is the term for an internal change in a word for a different
>> inflection? For example: draw/drew versus the regular talk/talked.
>> 
>> I'll try to clarify if need be. Just let me know.
>> 
>> Brian
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Second Person, a chapbook of poetry by Patrick Dunn, is now available for
> order from Finishing Line
> Press<http://www.finishinglinepress.com/NewReleasesandForthcomingTitles.htm>
> and
> Amazon<http://www.amazon.com/Second-Person-Patrick-Dunn/dp/1599249065/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1324342341&sr=8-2>.