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If Cat II introduces an /h/ epenthetically, maybe it's breathy.

By the way, the Pan-Nigerian alphabet (and Afrika Alphabet and African
Reference Alphabet) have letters you could use instead of diacritics in
your romanization.  They're in Unicode and several fonts.

On Mon, Mar 5, 2012 at 11:10 PM, Peter Cyrus <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> And is it clear what is meant by glottalization and laryngealization?
>  Those terms are usually both on the closed side of modal voice.  One would
> think it would be easier to distinguish one on either side, say slack and
> stiff, or hollow and harsh, or ATR/RTR.
>
>
> On Mon, Mar 5, 2012 at 10:30 PM, Peter Cyrus <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> You wrote /long after [+glottal].  Do you mean that glottalized vowels
>> are called "long", that they are long(er), or that some dialects express
>> this distinction as length instead of the glottalization/laryngealization?
>>
>> By "umlaut", do you mean that u o a become ü ö ä?  No, you mean the
>> weaker half of the root+suffix pair matches glottalization/laryngealization
>> with the stronger half, right?  But plain always loses?  And length
>> disappears in liaison?
>>
>> Does that mean that e: actually shortens when followed by another e?
>>
>>
>> On Mon, Mar 5, 2012 at 7:57 PM, Garth Wallace <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>>> On Mon, Mar 5, 2012 at 5:44 AM, Paul Bennett <[log in to unmask]>
>>> wrote:
>>> > On Sun, 04 Mar 2012 06:40:50 -0500, Paul Bennett <
>>> [log in to unmask]>
>>> > wrote:
>>> >
>>> > v5 is now up at
>>> >
>>> >
>>> >> http://sites.google.com/site/paulwbennett/Home/Hamer.pdf
>>> >>
>>> >> Work still very much in progress.
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > As I've been understanding more about the source text, I've been
>>> making some
>>> > pretty noticeable changes to the orthographies, and there are some typo
>>> > fixes in there too.
>>> >
>>> > Comments, questions, and suggestions more than welcome.
>>>
>>> Idle thoughts: I wonder if a Hamer tengwar mode would work.
>>>
>>
>>
>