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On 2012-05-04 07:45, Peter Cyrus wrote:
> How about "casative"?

There was no CASARE -- not even in Vulgar Latin if Meyer-L├╝bke is
to be trusted --, and *if* it had existed I'm sure it would have
meant 'set up house, start a family'.

Even though the meaning of the case called "apudessive"
in NE Caucasian languages isn't quite what we're after
here I never heard that cases in different languages
which are given the same label by linguists always have
the same meaning or function.  A good grammar is required
to describe the function of any case, however labelled,
in the language under description.  E.g. the Finnish case
labelled "nominative" has a rather restricted function
compared to the same-labelled case of (most) Indo-European
languages.

/bpj

>
> On Fri, May 4, 2012 at 1:55 AM, And Rosta<[log in to unmask]>  wrote:
>
>> R A Brown, On 02/05/2012 21:59:
>>
>>> On 02/05/2012 19:09, And Rosta wrote:
>>>
>>>> Who can come up with more suitable terms than _chezative_
>>>> and _disseminative_?
>>>>
>>>
>>> _disseminative_ is well-formed.
>>>
>>
>> I was thinking that _disseminare_ meant only 'to sow', so was inapt, tho
>> on checking I see it means also 'to strew', so is actually apt.
>>
>>
>>
>>> I will tentatively suggest _domiciliative_ and
>>>> _dispersative_, with deference in advance to RAB, BPJ, Wm
>>>> A, et al.
>>>>
>>>
>>> _dispersive_ is better.
>>>
>>
>> It'd be better for an ordinary English adjective formed from _dispergere_,
>> but it seems to me (on the basis of mere observation) firstly that English
>> linguistic terminology prefers _-ative_ endings, e.g. _reversative_ (rather
>> than _reversive_), and secondly that Latin allows relatively productively
>> the formation of _-are_ verbs (usually with frequentative meaning?) from
>> the participle of _-ere/-ire_ verbs. Hence _dispersative_ from a potential
>> _dispersare_.  That, at any rate, was the thinking behind my suggested
>> _dispersative_.
>>
>>
>>   The Latin for "at the house of" is 'apud', so I guess
>>> _apudessive_ ;)
>>>
>>
>> O excellent word! How richly rewarded now my faith in you!
>>
>>   Kind of related to this: Does anybody know where the term
>>>> _andative_ comes from?
>>>>
>>>
>>> ..and _venitive_ - ach y fi!
>>>
>>> Presumably _andative_ and _ventive_ are Hispano-Latin
>>> hybrids; if they have gained currency then why not the
>>> Franco-Latin hybrid _chezative_ ?
>>>
>>
>> At least _andative_ and _venitive_ are consistent with Latin phonology and
>> orthography. _Chezative_ is consistent with neither -- but perhaps that
>> gives it an engaging insouciance; it wears on its sleeve its failure to
>> conform to expected standards of terminological probity.
>>
>> --And.
>>
>