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Yes, at first the literature said that Aymará was completely trivalent, so
there would be a third alternative to going or not going.  We have plenty
of those in real life, which we explain at different levels, such as "The
King of France is Japanese" or Bill Clinton's "I didn't have sex with that
woman".  In most situations, there's a border condition which is neither,
or a presupposition which, if not satisfied, makes either alternative
impossible,

But I think it's only in modal logic that Aymará is trivalent.
 Aristotelian (2-valued) logic has Certain, Impossible (=certainly not) and
Possible (=possibly not), but trivalent logic applies that trio to each of
itself, kind of "squaring" it.  So they apparently have an adverb which
means that a proposition is certainly-not true, but possibly false and
possibly unknown (or not yet happened), and so on.

Here's a link:  http://aymara.org/biblio/html/igr/igr.html

On Wed, May 2, 2012 at 9:50 PM, Eugene Oh <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> How does that work, exactly? She either goes or doesn't go. And she either
> definitely goes or might/might not go. I'm curious how the combination of
> three dualities works.
>
> Eugene
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> 2 May 2012, в 20:13, Peter Cyrus <[log in to unmask]> написал(а):
>
> > According to what I've read, the Andean language Aymará has three-valued
> > modal logic, with 27 (3 cubed) adverbial moods, essentially.  In Aymará,
> > it's possible to express doubt about the negation of a sentence but no
> > doubt about its affirmation, or vice versa.  In other words, you could
> say
> > that "she will go to the store tomorrow" is definitely possible and might
> > even be true, but it's certainly not false.
> >
> > On Wed, May 2, 2012 at 7:22 PM, BPJ <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >
> >> On 2012-05-02 04:02, Ian Spolarich wrote:
> >>
> >>> Basically, what I'm asking is, is it plausible?
> >>>
> >>
> >> Sure. There are natlangs which have such a mood.
> >>
> >> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/**Dubitative_mood<
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dubitative_mood>
> >>>
> >>
> >> And is there any way to use
> >>> the dubitative for more than just "It's doubtful that she will go to
> the
> >>> store on Monday" sort of thing?
> >>>
> >>
> >> As you can see from the translations of the Ojibwe
> >> example on th WP page it is not used (only) to say
> >> "It's doubtful that..." but generally when you are
> >> in doubt about the truth value of what you are saying.
> >> It would cover "I'm not sure but I hope/wish/think/expect...".
> >>
> >> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/**Irrealis_mood#Dubitative<
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irrealis_mood#Dubitative>
> >>>
> >> gives another illustrative example where "He's in California
> >> today" + DUB is translated as "I guess he'll be in CA today",
> >> i.e. anything hypothetical is morphologically dubitative.
> >>
> >> /bpj
> >>
>