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W dniu 15.06.2012 15:57, Andrew Jarrette pisze:
> On Thu, 14 Jun 2012 22:48:41 -0400, Charles W Brickner <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
>>> From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Andrew Jarrette
>>
>>> I distinguish grammatical gender (masculine, feminine, neuter) from noun classes as in Swahili, since noun classes are based on natural distinctions.  Grammatical gender is not based on natural distinctions.
>>
>> That's only partially true.  The MA class contains the words shauri, advice; yai, egg; ua, flower; jiwe, stone.  I don't see a natural distinction that would put them in the same class.  The N class has ndege, bird; ngoma, drum; nguo, cloth; njaa, hunger.  I fail to see the natural distinction that puts these in the same class.
>>
>> Charlie
> 
> All the more reason not to have either grammatical gender or noun classes in a language: they serve no purpose.

Sure, but that's just only your aesthetic choice. I'm not a native
English speaker, so for me English has a lot of features, which can be
safely discarded as I don't use them in my language (Polish): all the
perfect tenses, "future in the past"; marking the definiteness with
articles - why should I care about the difference between "an apple" and
"the apple" unless I *really* want to point a very specific apple?;
several conditional clauses, one should be enough; strict word order
etc. If you really think about it, most parts of speech or grammar
features can be considered "pointless" ;).

-- 
Best regards,
Krzysztof Mitko