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Thanks for the information, I'll have to do some research in this field !


On Sat, 16 Jun 2012 12:56:22 -0500, Patrick Dunn <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>An interesting notion.  There are some linguists working along similar
>lines, yielding work like this:
>
>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_primes
>
>Which I find fascinating and intend, at some point, to spend some time on.
>
>On Sat, Jun 16, 2012 at 12:42 PM, Yaesen Kole <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>
>> Hello everyone !
>>
>> I want to talk to you about my project: A while ago, I wondered (for a
>> story) what form would a language take if it was designed to communicate
>> with aliens. One characteristic immediately jumped in my mind: a vocabulary
>> as small and exhaustive as possible.
>>
>> So I wondered how many root concepts could be isolated in a list (in a
>> conlang, all the other possible words with a link with those words could be
>> obtained by adding affixes to the root word). I couldn't find such a list,
>> so I decided to make one.
>>
>> But (and here is the technical part) to make such a list, I had to use an
>> object-oriented approach. Think about it:
>>
>> If we take the example of an object (class "artificial object"):
>> An artificial object has:
>>    _a user (class "person")
>>    _a maker (class "person")
>>    _a use (class "action")
>>    _a verb for using
>>    _a verb for making
>>    _ etc...
>>
>> Eventually, the idea is to take a large list of words, sort them in a
>> "class tree", and after that, link them with each other to have kind of a
>> "concept network". That will help me isolate basic concepts.
>>
>> To do this work, I'm using a list of words (a HUGE list, ~150k words (with
>> nouns, verbs, adjectives, etc...), necessary for exhaustiveness), all in
>> French (my native language), that I reduced from ~30k words to ~15k words
>> for nouns (didn't process verbs or adjectives or anything else for now) by
>> removing redundancies and invented words you'd never see in a conversation
>> (the list was made out of lots of books, with statistics that I will use
>> later). It's VERY long, but I really want to finish it.
>>
>> This is a work that has been occupying my free time for about 2 years now,
>> and I was wondering if anyone here ever attempted a similar approach? if
>> you did, could you show me your list of classes? could you tell me about
>> your results? I intend to publish mine of course, when I'm ready... but I
>> have some tricky little problems to solve before that!
>>
>> Friendly,
>> Yaesen
>>
>
>
>
>--
>Second Person, a chapbook of poetry by Patrick Dunn, is now available for
>order from Finishing Line
>Press<http://www.finishinglinepress.com/NewReleasesandForthcomingTitles.htm>
>and
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