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On Jul 3, 2012, at 9:15 AM, Sam Stutter wrote:

> You may all have seen this: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-18687504 Scientists have discovered that the lost sunken lands of western Europe were much larger than previously thought.

Many thanks; I'd never heard of this area, and it's fascinating that it was above water so recently.

> 
> Under the improbable situation that Doggerland managed to avoid going all Atlantis, the question is what language(s) would be spoken there through recorded history?
> 
> I'm certain people have done this before with smaller-Doggerland. The new dynamic is that it makes the barriers between European language families much weaker. A nordic speaker would only need to cross something like the English Channel to get into a Celtic(?) heartland. The Romans would have had no real barrier between France and southern Scotland. Germanic and Celtic would have much more contact over a vastly enlarged border area.
> 
> Would there be less distinction between the language families? Would one (or more) existing language(s) take root there? Or would a vastly different European language emerge?

All excellent questions. I'm guessing the language families actually spoken in Doggerland would have a historical presence, but other than that I don't know.