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>Are all of your roots diconsonantal? That seems superficially similar to what I've done with Mev Pailom; inspired by Semitic triliteral roots, reduced to 2 to make words shorter, but the consonant positions in Mev Pailom are filled by clusters rather than individual consonant segments to vastly expand the number of possible distinct roots. Do you perhaps have tables or other sharable documentation of your conjugation/declension/derivation paradigms?

I was at first inspired by Semitic consonant roots, yes, but the short
answer is no, Hsassiens has consonantal roots of 2,3 or 4 consonants.
It could even be said that it contains single-consonant roots, but
those function as the most common auxiliary particles rather than
actual noun/verb/adj/adv stems.  And alas, I do not have tables or
sharable documentation to present on the language just yet, but that
grammar, like so very many other things in life, is still a work in
progress.

>Mev Pailom has multiple different derivation classes, each of which has a completely independent paradigm, with potentially completely size and shape. Root concepts are assigned to derivation classes based on which sets of derived meanings are most likely to be actually useful. So, several small paradigms that capture just the useful elements rather than one big all-encompassing paradigm with a lot of useless slots.

It's a wonderful thing sometimes to find that others have the same
problems you have experienced, and this is one such case.  I've done
something of the same differentiation, but because of the constraints
of my system for Hsassiens, the classes I've come up with are somewhat
different.  Hsassiens is an artlang for a fictional world containing
immortal beings.  As such, the six genders I've constructed for it are
1-Male/Mortal
2-Female/Mortal
3-Concrete(inanimate 5-senses-perceivable/observable)
4-Abstract(philosophical concept or principle)
5-Male/Immortal
6-Female/Immortal.
Roots are classified by whether they have a Concrete, Abstract or
Personal "base" noun form.  That way, according to the base form,
certain noun/adjective/verb structures would be theoretically possible
but not expected as common occurrence, much the same way that English
is capable of producing a sentence like "That grassiness next to my
living-place is definitely orchardable, with the right workyness."
Though the meaning is understandable, there are more common and
readily-understandable ways of conveying that meaning.  The different
base classes help to differentiate that.
Specifically, Concrete roots (like the stem for “ring”) are not
expected to take Personal forms.  Their declension if they do requires
an auxiliary personal adjective to clarify examples such as the "ring"
example discussed above, such that "Ring-maker" (Ring-TVJY, Make-TV)
would translate roughly to -atvètajya ètètavè-,
male/mortal/nominative/noun/singular ring-man -----
male/mortal/nominative/adjective/singular maker.  In this instance,
the adjective locks in the otherwise vague noun-reference, as opposed
to -ahètasa ètètavè-, (Parent-HS) "a father who makes stuff."  Father
is a personal root, and is expected to take a personal form (in this
case the Male/Mortal -èta-), and so the adjective just adds details,
since it is not expected to lock in any vagueness or ambiguity.
After reading your last email with Mev Pailom's paradigms laid out,
not only will I be using "flatitude" as often as possible for the rest
of my life, (there's just something wonderfully exact about it), but
I'm also curious about how Mev Pailom is structured syntactically.  I
ask because in reference to the original purpose of this chain, Mev
Pailom seems to be much closer to the interests of efficiency in word
quantity than Hsassiens.  If the paradigms you've quoted contain the
words as they would appear in a Mev Pailom sentence, then that
suggests it is reliant on word order or auxiliary particles for case
and argument identification, in which case the number of unique words
in the language is greatly reduced.  It puts me in mind of Tagalog's
Ang/Ng/Sa markers for sentence structure, as well as their
sometimes-extraordinarily-intricate conjugation methods, which I have
to admit were the primary inspiration for some of my structures in
Hsassiens.