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--- On Mon, 7/30/12, David McCann <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

My own theory is that if the adjective precedes, it's easy to see where
the noun phrase ends – with the noun. If the noun comes first, you only
register that the phrase has ended when the speaker stops adding
adjectives. The phrase is looser, as it were, and adjectival agreement
ties it up. Uninflected languages with postponed adjectives like tend to
avoid multiple adjectives, using relative clauses instead. E.g. Malay
rumah batu yang baru
house stone that new
"new stone house"
When the adjective inflects and follows, like Swahili, two adjectives
are acceptable
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That's true about Malay, especially if the NP is indefinite. If it's definite (at least in Indonesian) then the noun phrase ends with "itu" = 'that, the' or "ini" 'this' and I'm not sure, but I think you can pile on several adjectives and prep.phrases between the noun and the "itu"

Kash would work much the same way. Not sure whether I've dealt with this in Prevli, which is also noun-first; in Gwr, which is adj-first, I think you could use multiple adjective, probably connected with "and".