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Well, this changes much in the discussion about the Yemoran's medieval
culture and the way of life (only cities, interstellar contacts). I'd
replace the word "medieval" with "pre-industrial", which just means that
Yemorans do not produce machines more complex than, say, clock and windmill
and no engines at all.

At this point You may have whatever explanation why do Yemorans live in the
cities. Why, they are dragons, their physiology and psychology may be
totally different from ours, or be similar, but with unexpected quirks.
Say, they need to stay within some close range of some kind of energizing
rocks, around which their cities are built, but if they have some king of
herding or agriculture they just have no problem to fly a long distance to
their fields or pastures.

Back to to language construction, the Yemoran's may have such kind of
speaking apparatus that they may pronounce the sounds impossible for humans
and vice versa.

On Tue, Oct 16, 2012 at 1:26 AM, Nicole Valicia Thompson-Andrews <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Comming into contact with English words works. TYemoans are a dragon
> culture.
>
> Emerging poet
> Pen Name Mellissa Green
> Budding novelist
> tweet me
>
>
>
> GreenNovelist
>
> blog
>
>
> www.theworldofyemora.**wordpress.com<http://www.theworldofyemora.wordpress.com>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Sam Stutter" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Monday, October 15, 2012 7:08 PM
> Subject: Re: Yemoran Expressions
>
>
>
> What? Sayings and slang - correct me if I'm wrong - are two entirely
> different things. Slang is using non-standard, informal and (very often)
> "impolite" words. There are plenty of really great slang sources:
> urbandictionary.com is my favourite :)
>
> There's always plenty of slang words for "police" and anything that's
> illegal. Slang is independent of dialect or accent and usually unites one
> social group - the military produces copious amounts of slang. How do you
> invent slang? Well, you can borrow from other languages your conlang might
> have come into contact with - the English word "chav", for example,
> probably comes from Romani gypsy "chavi" meaning "boy" or (I only learnt
> this the other day) the British army term "sangar" probably comes from
> Hindi.
>
> You can twist existing words by modifying their sound, squishing two
> existing words together "manbag" (male handbag), "hatinator" (a cross
> between a hat and a fascinator) or using them differently "scally" (meaning
> miscreant, but actually meaning "Liverpudlian" but actually meaning a type
> of stew) or using acronyms inventively - hence "fubar" and "yuppie". Then
> again, words can simply be made up, like "yomp" (I swear it's a backronym).
>
> "Sayings"? You mean like "a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush"?
> Just work out what your people need to express often enough that an analogy
> comes in handy. What sort of things do your people come into contact with?
> If they're a fishing culture, they're likely to have a lot of fish-based
> analogies. I dunno... "sadder than a pair of empty waders"? If they breed a
> lot of cattle, they're likely to have lots of cattle-based analogies...
> uh... "when the bull looks annoyed, it's no time to lean on the hedge".
>
> Sam Stutter
> [log in to unmask]
> "No e na'l cu barri"
>
>
>
>
> On 15 Oct 2012, at 23:29, Nicole Valicia Thompson-Andrews <
> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>  I meant sayings and slang expressions.
>> Emerging poet
>> Pen Name Mellissa Green
>> Budding novelist
>> tweet me
>>
>>
>>
>> GreenNovelist
>>
>> blog
>>
>>
>> www.theworldofyemora.**wordpress.com<http://www.theworldofyemora.wordpress.com>
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Nikolay Ivankov" <
>> [log in to unmask]>
>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent: Monday, October 15, 2012 8:16 AM
>> Subject: Re: Yemoran Expressions
>>
>>
>>  That's the question that make people like me come to the conlang list.
>>> Because Your question may actually be interpreted as "how do I create a
>>> language?". And since the whole list is functioning for such a long lime,
>>> with different people of different ages, nationalities and views still
>>> have
>>> plenty of stuff to discuss for so many years, this question could not be
>>> answered lightly.
>>>
>>> As a novice in that, I can recommend learning a new language. It's the
>>> easiest way to become on par with the terminology. Also, every new
>>> language
>>> you learn gives you new unexpected insights. For me learning Japanese
>>> was a
>>> mind-blowing experience, and though I have almost forgotten this
>>> languages
>>> within the years that passed since then, it has strongly influenced me
>>> and,
>>> finally, led me here.
>>>
>>> One could have also suggested reading some more theoretical works, but
>>> I'm
>>> afraid they are seldom available as audiobooks or even in a format that
>>> could be read by a voice-generator. I'm definitely not sure, but I had to
>>> take the books I needed from the library, for they are also quite
>>> expensive. I hope that this may be different with the language courses -
>>> in
>>> the end, in most more or less big cities it is always possible to just
>>> attend one.
>>>
>>> Once you get familiar with basic constructions and how they vary in
>>> different languages, you have much more space for imagination. And that's
>>> when you may start to fancy, how such and such phrase may sound in your
>>> conlang. Here, again, we all have much freedom. Language itself is a
>>> piece
>>> of art, just like a novel or a verse. Other people can give advises,
>>> share
>>> common patterns, but that's it.
>>>
>>> Sorry, if my e-mail was not helpful. That is as much as I can suggest.
>>>
>>> Best luck with Yermona!
>>>
>>> Kolya
>>>
>>> On Mon, Oct 15, 2012 at 8:13 AM, Nicole Valicia Thompson-Andrews <
>>> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>
>>>  How do I create Yemoran expressions?
>>>> Emerging poet
>>>> Pen Name Mellissa Green
>>>> Budding novelist
>>>> tweet me
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> GreenNovelist
>>>>
>>>> blog
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> www.theworldofyemora.**wordpress.com<http://www.theworldofyemora.wordpress.com>
>>>>
>>>