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>Did you get the values for specific hues by dividing the blue--red spectrum
>into 9 equal stretches and picking the median hue? Or by equating extreme
>red and blue with the extremes of F2 and plotting the other vowels on the
>corresponding point in the colour spectrum according to their F2 value? Or
>just by picking 9 psychologically salient hues and assigning them to the
>nine peripheral vowels?

There are 6 hues (primary R G B and secondary C M Y) and 6 vowel letters <a>
<e> <i> <o> <u> <y> (originally with the phonetic value [ΓΌ]) in the Latin
alphabet, so the association of the triangle of primary colors R G B with
the vowel triangle /u/ /a/ /i/ is simple.
The tertiary colors can be also associated with long vowels, which usually
are more closed than the corresponding short vowels:
ii - i - ee - e - ae - a - ao - o - oo - u - uu - ui
V - B - A - C - T - G - L - Y - O - R - S - M
(The names for tertiary colors are not standardised, so I chose Violet,
Azure, Turquoise, Lime, Orange and Scarlet to have distinct initials.)
These dozen vowels and colors can be also associated with the dozen
halftones of the octave and with the dozen months of the year.
But the division to dozen hues and dozen vowels is too subtle and could lead 
to misunderstanding, so for languages spoken by humans I prefer the division 
only to 6 hues. OTOH, it could be interesting to create a language for other 
species, with many vowels and only very few consonants (for example with 20 
vowels and 6 consonants, contrary to the Latin alphabet with 6 vowels and 20 
consonants).