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This is a bit OT, but it did come up in the context of conlang translation...

Patrick Dunn, On 15/11/2012 20:59:
> Yup, that's a common misreading.  But it is a misreading.

I argued in an earlier message that the alleged misreading is a better reading than the 'correct' one.

Furthermore, what is your criterion for determining a reading's correctness, and how in the present instance does it lead you to conclude that the OED v1(12b) reading is incorrect?

> Whether or not a particular reader knows a word doesn't change the
> nature of a text, only of the reader's interpretation.  If we had
> this standard for all reading, then "In a Station of the Metro" would
> be about ghosts.

What is a text? Does it have only one correct interpretation? Or does it have potentially many correct interpretations but also potential incorrect interpretations too?  (I mean these questions nonrhetorically; I realize they fall within your area of professional expertise.)

With an ordinary nonliterary text, one might reasonably define the correct interpretation(s) as the ones the speaker strives to ensure the addressee makes, with the presumption that the speaker constructs the text in such a way as to maximize (within general Gricean constraints) the likelihood of the addressee making the desired interpretations. That presumption isn't applicable to poetical texts, and nor, it seems, is the definition.

--And.

> On Thu, Nov 15, 2012 at 1:09 PM, And Rosta<[log in to unmask]>  wrote:
>
>> Herman Miller, On 15/11/2012 02:11:
>>
>>> On 11/14/2012 3:22 AM, R A Brown wrote:
>>>
>>>> I know of no uses of "to blow" with a passive meaning, i.e. "are
>>>> being blown."
>>>>
>>>
>>> "The answer, my friend, is blowing in the wind..." comes to mind.
>>>
>>
>> Indeed. If you have access to the OED, it's _blow_ v.1 sense 12b. The
>> earliest citations are:
>>
>> 1842   Tennyson Goose xiii, in Poems (new ed.) I. 233   Her cap blew off,
>> her gown blew up.
>>
>> 1842   Tennyson Day-dream in Poems (new ed.) II. 156   The hedge broke in,
>> the banner blew.
>>
>> The version of _In Flanders Field_ I'd known has _grow_ at the end of the
>> first line, but on first reading the version with _blow_ (in this thread),
>> I had an image of the poppies fluttering gently in the breeze, like banners
>> or pennants.
>>
>> --And.
>>
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