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On Monday, 19 November, 2012 21:52:22 you wrote:
> For people who have developed a conlang with its own culture, I was curious
> to know how were the people named (or how would you do it?): two parents
> choosing a name that sounds good for the kid when s/he is born or something
> else?

	Enamyn naming convention was such: 
The House + Individual name, by Patronymic/Matronymic, of Clan
	The house, or family, name was patrilineal (and was in the adjectival 
possessive form and preceeded by the direct article), while the clan name was 
the mother's clan (and was in the genitive case). Men would have a patronymic 
(their father's name in the instrumental case), while women would have a 
matronymic (their mother's name in the instrumental case).
	There were nine primary clans and five sub-clans, which were fairly 
static throughout the 600+ years of recorded history. Only two sub-clans 
developed during that time, both in response to internal divisions. The clan 
structure was used to resolve disputes and provide a form of governance that 
operated parallel to the governance of the cities,
	Houses, on the other hand, were more dynamic; while a first son was 
expected to carry on his father's house, younger sons could choose a new house 
name, either adopting another existing house (for example, the house of a 
patron) or creating a new one (especially if they had made a name for 
themselves). As part of the marriage ceremony, a groom would state his full 
name (and thus declare his house); afterwards, he could not change his house. 
Switching houses was not without its consequences, however; to reject one's 
father's house could be taken as a tacit rejection of the father, thus 
potentially cutting them off from their support and inheritance. Generally, 
only young men who were confident and secure -- or had nothing to lose but 
everything to gain -- would do so. Women, however, had no choice but to keep 
their father's house name.
	The individual name was unique within the house; because the house name 
was in the adjectival possessive form, it was common for the individual name 
to be a noun that would fit well with the house name; e.g. "The Harvest's 
Abundance", where "The Harvest's" is the house name and "Abundance" the 
individual name. Other sources of individual names included Greek and Biblical 
(after the introduction of Christianity around 250 AD) names. Because the name 
had to be unique, lists were kept for all the names in current use by every 
house. A name could be re-used only after the death of its previous bearer, 
and in the case of a few very note-worthy people, was permanently retired.
	To use a person's full name was very formal and was generally reserved 
only for ceremonies. On the other end of the spectrum, using only a person's 
individual name was very informal, used only by family members and close 
friends. Varying degrees of (in)formality were achieved depending upon which 
names were used.
	:Peter