Print

Print


                Hi!

                So, to address a couple of topics brought up:

                Oh, and I just used Roman letters with that Greek sentence
because I wasn’t sure how to type the right letters except for finding them
one by one, and I just didn’t have time for that.  Anyway, anyone who
would’ve  guessed what I meant probably already guessed what I meant.  I
think.

                Moving on.

#

                I’m going to leave “flower milk with sugar” to the
imagination of the reader for the moment.  Instead I’m going to bring up
the complication of having to substitute a culturally appropriate food or
drink and still have it make sense.  One reason I wanted to work upon this
text is because I realized that, whatever I did with wine at the wedding,
I’d probably also have to do to the wine at the Last Supper.  As far as I
remember, wine is mentioned in the different versions of the Last Supper,
and then Jesus is acting like the host, or perhaps the bridegroom at his
party.

                I thought perhaps that milk would work (or flower milk) in
this context because the Promised Land in the Old Testament is sometimes
called “The Land of Milk and Honey.”  This way, perhaps there can be a
thematic parallel between the story of Jesus and the story of the Exodus.  The
Gospels often make reference to fulfilling the Old Testament anyway.  There
may even be ways to describe Jesus’ words as “like honey.”

                Plus, milk seems a rather pure thing, at least to the Real
People, since it comes from flowers.

#

                I’m sure that Prince Khyèxhrowe Khyexhròwiqan (“Beloved of
the Ancestors”) was eager to perform his first miracle, but, being a pious
prince he still consults with his mother after all, even though he is
thrice eleven winters of age.  His filial piety, though, I think, is going
to be a theme throughout these stories.

#

                The numbers 3, 7, and 11 are sacred.  A great deal of
arithmetic is done just by using multiples of seven or eleven.  For more
complicated mathematics, there is an entire base-11 numbering system.  It
can make fractions a bit difficult, at least for me.

#

                Eunuchs are grammatically feminine, so they are called
“she” or “women.”  They even wear womens’ dresses, though their costumes
are denote them as eunuchs rather than free women.  Eunuchs are permitted
in harems and to do tasks appropriate for women.

                It’s interesting that the text mentions a “chief eunuch.”  Even
among slaves there are hierarchies, and trusted household slaves really
become a part of their masters’ families, in a way.

                This Eunuch of course thanks both the parents and
grandparents of the bride and groom.   Grandparents will probably have to
be mentioned a few times where the text just has “father,” because
grandparents are important.  (Plus, grandmothers and great-aunts usually
arrange the marriages.)

#

                I must admit I’m a little sad to cut out Joseph from this
version, since he’s a very interesting character.  But he just wouldn’t
make sense in this world.   However, even in our world it’s not without
precedent.  If I remember right, Joseph isn’t even mentioned in the Qur’an,
plus Mary is the only woman mentioned by name.  Also, she’s Moses’ sister,
making Jesus his nephew.

                Since Prince Khyexhròwiqan’s mother was a daughter of
Emperor Khyìlyikh, he could be called “Khyìlyikh’s Son,” though I’m not
sure whether that will turn up in the text.  This makes the Prince a nephew
of the current Emperor and a cousin to the future Crown Prince.  Perhaps
where Luke mentions “Is not this Joseph’s son, the carpenter,” it could be
rendered as “the Emperor’s nephew, the trouble maker.”