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I have quite often heard the word else pronounced 'elts' as if the s is an affricate. I'm not sure if this is common or where it comes from but I have heard it on American television and one if my Australian friends says it (although she also pronounces zed as zee and drops the yod in new)

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On 6/12/2012, at 2:41 PM, MorphemeAddict <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On Wed, Dec 5, 2012 at 8:31 PM, Brian Woodward <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
>> According to the Language Log (thank you Alex Fink for the link) this "t"
>> usage is predominant in the Mid-Atlantic/New England areas (as professed
>> below by Padraic as well). However, it seems strange that the statistics
>> (from Bill Kretzschmar via Language Log) explicitly exclude Virginia which
>> is whence my wife hails, and she and all her kin use this "t".
> 
> Do her kith use the "t" too? lol
> 
> stevo
> 
>> 
>> Brian
>> 
>> On Wed, Dec 5, 2012 at 6:16 PM, Padraic Brown <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>>> --- On Wed, 12/5/12, Brian Woodward <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>> 
>>>> First I have a quick question before
>>>> I get to my actual question. The word whence; when used does
>>>> it require the use of the word from. E.g. "…whence it
>>>> came" or "…from whence it came"?
>>> 
>>> I've always understood "from when it came" to be a sort of mock-high-
>>> archaic style. In its defence, I think it is a better prosodic fit than
>>> "whence it came". Compare the following:
>>> 
>>> x       x        x        x       x         x         x
>>> Go thou foul and fiendish beast | back from whence ye came!
>>> 
>>> x       x        x        x       x    x         x
>>> Go thou foul and fiendish beast | back whence ye came!
>>> 
>>> But "whence" all by itself already means "from where", so twould be be
>>> redundant to say, in effect, "from from where".
>>> 
>>>> Okay, on to my actual question. Has anyone noticed in
>>>> colloquial English speech (Southern American) the addition
>>>> of a *t* at the end of certain words? E.g. Close(t)est and
>>>> across(t). I've noticed that my wife along with several
>>>> other "Southerners" do this and I can't seem rationalize it
>>>> in any way. Might any of you have heard this and have some
>>>> explanation?
>>> 
>>> I have, though never from a Southerner. My father was from central NY and
>>> always had "oncet" and "acrosst". I think this is also typical of
>>> Pennsylvania Dutch English -- every touristy guide you can lay hands on
>> in
>>> Lancaster and environs talks about "wunst" or "onc't" as typical of the
>>> dialect.
>>> 
>>> So, you've heard it among southerners, I've heard it among northerners
>>> and PA Dutch -- maybe it's a pretty widespread phenomenon?
>>> 
>>> Padraic
>>> 
>>>> Brian
>>