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Yes, it is VERY common in African American contexts.  If you have
African-American friends, it won't be long before it will come up in a
conversation -- "You know David, that guy with good hair."  "I hate my
sister.  She got good hair."  I remember when my mom was mugged on the way
to the bus stop early one morning 20 years ago.  The first thing the women
at her job asked her was if it was that "guy with good hair" that had
attacked several women in that part of town recently.  "Good hair"
conversations can go on and on and on.....

Adam

On Mon, Dec 17, 2012 at 3:56 AM, Leonardo Castro <[log in to unmask]>wrote:

> 2012/12/17 Garth Wallace <[log in to unmask]>:
> > On Fri, Dec 14, 2012 at 2:16 PM, Leonardo Castro <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> >> Hi!
> >>
> >> How common is using "good" and "bad" to refer to "straight" and
> >> "curly/frizzy/kinky" air?
> >>
> >> Is it a product of white-black contact or did it occur before?
> >
> >
> > It's pretty much limited to the African-American community. I would
> > guess it's relatively recent, but have no facts to back it up.
>
> Indeed, I asked that because I have been recently hearing these
> expressions in the African-American community context, but I have
> always heard the same expressions in Brazilian Portuguese, "cabelo
> bom" e "cabelo ruim", in a kind of gradation from straight to kinky
> hair.
>